Tuesday , November 21 2017
Naltrexone-label

Naltrexone (Revia)

Generic Name: Naltrexone (nal TREX own)

Brand Names: Revia

 

 

Where to buy Naltrexone online?

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Product Description

Naltrexone is a drug that can reverse the addictive effect alcohol and opioids have on the brain. It is often used in combination with therapy to treat alcoholics and street drug users. The hydrochloride salt version of Naltrexone is sold under the brand names Revia and Depade.

 

Drug Information

 

Naltrexone is an opiate antagonist. It can reduce or lessen the effects such the “high” and cravings induced by alcohol and opiates. Naltrexone is more frequently used to treat alcohol abuse. The drug was authorized in 1984 by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to threat opiate addiction.

 

Research-backed evidence has shown that Naltrexone is effective in reducing heavy drinking when combined with counseling and support group therapy. This combination treatment program is known as the Sinclair Method.

 

Medical research is less convincing in indicating whether Naltrexone can completely prevent alcohol abuse or reduce cravings for addictive drugs.

 

Naltrexone works by blocking the opiod receptors in the brain. Research has suggested that Naltrexone is most effective in patients with a gene called Asp40, which is a variant of the common opioid receptor gene.

 

Naltrexone is sometimes used to treat psychiatric patients afflicted with certain dissociative disorders. Studies have provided no evidence that Naltrexone can reduce nicotine addiction or help patients cede smoking.

 

Dosage

 

The dosage of Naltrexone will depend on the condition being treated and the age of the patient. As Naltrexone is used in combination with counseling, dosage can vary depending on other factors as well.

 

Naltrexone is available as orally consumable tablets. Naltrexone tablets can either be taken at home by the patient or administered under the supervision of a medical professional or a sponsor.

 

Naltrexone is usually taken once per day if at home. At a clinic, the tablets are administered once a day or with multiple daily intervals within a week. Naltrexone can be taken with or without food.

 

Patients who take Naltrexone at home must carefully read all the instructions provided with the packaging and follow the directions exactly as prescribed by a doctor.

 

Naltrexone by itself cannot adequately treat alcohol or street drug dependence. Patients must also attend all counseling sessions and undergo therapy treatments in order for the drug to be effective.

 

Side Effects

 

Naltrexone may cause one or more of the following side effects:

 

four_dot_bullet_red Nausea
four_dot_bullet_red Vomiting
four_dot_bullet_red Constipation
four_dot_bullet_red Diarrhea
four_dot_bullet_red Dizziness
four_dot_bullet_red Stomach pain or cramps
four_dot_bullet_red Loss of appetite
four_dot_bullet_red Irritability
four_dot_bullet_red Headache
four_dot_bullet_red Anxiety
four_dot_bullet_red Nervousness
four_dot_bullet_red Rashes
four_dot_bullet_red Tearfulness
four_dot_bullet_red Drowsiness
four_dot_bullet_red Increased or decreased levels of energy
four_dot_bullet_red Muscle or joint pain
four_dot_bullet_red Difficulty falling or staying asleep

 

Immediately inform a doctor if side effects worsen or do not disappear after a week.

 

Precautions

 

four_dot_bullet_red Do not take Naltrexone if allergic to any of the ingredients in the tablets.

 

four_dot_bullet_red Naltrexone may not be completely safe to use for patients with a history of hepatitis or liver disease.

 

four_dot_bullet_red Though Naltrexone in prescribed doses does not cause liver damage, large doses of Naltrexone can.

 

four_dot_bullet_red Naltrexone should not be taken along with alcohol and opiod drugs. Patients who may have taken one or more of these substances between 7 to 10 days before the treatments begins should inform their physician.

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